Phylum cndaria

Coral Fossils Corals are marine organisms of class Anthozoa Kingdom AnimaliaPhylum CnidariaClass Anthozoa that typically live in large colonies of identical individuals. They are important reef builders in tropical seas, and are secretors of calcium carbonate CaCO3 that forms their hard skeleton. Class Anthozoa likely appeared in the Precambrian, though the fossil record is sparse and inconclusive.

Phylum cndaria

True Jellyfish Box Jellyfish Cnidaria is a large phylum composed of some of the most beautiful of all the salt and freshwater organisms: Although Cnidaria is an incredibly diverse group of animals, there are several traits that link them together.

Most cnidarians are dipoblastic, which means that they are composed of only two layers of cells. The outer layer is known as the ectoderm or epidermis, and the inner layer is known as the endoderm or gastrodermis. These layers contain the nerve nets that control the muscular and sensory functions of the animal.

Between these layers is a jelly-like noncellular substance known as mesoglea, which in true jellyfish constitute the vast bulk of the animal hence their common name. In other species, the mesoglea may be nearly absent. All cnidarians have a single opening into the body which acts as both the mouth and anus, taking in food and expelling waste.

In most species the mouth is lined with tentacles which act to capture food. The mouth leads to a body cavity known as the coelenteron, where the food is digested. This body cavity has given this phylum its other, less commonly used, name of Coelenterata.

Cnidarians have a complex life cycle that, depending on the species, may alternate between two forms. The first form is known as a polyp, which is sessile anchored to one spot.

Phylum cndaria

The polyps are tubular in shape, with the mouth, often lined with tentacles, facing upwards. The bodies often contain a type of skeleton that may surround the tissues exoskeleton or be surrounded by the tissues endoskeleton. Polyps also have a hydrostatic skeleton, where the muscles in the endoderm work against the fluid contained in the coelenteron, thus extending the polyps.

Hydrostatic skeletons are also present in the tentacles, allowing them to be extended to capture food. Polyps often form large colonies, where a trait known as polymorphism may occur: For example, one polyp may only be used for defence, while another is used for reproduction and another for capturing food.

Not all polyps do this, however, and may live solitary lives.

Annotated classification

Some cnidarians, such as true coral and sea anemones, live their entire lives in the polyp stage and do not metamorphose into the second form, which is known as the medusa.

In true jellyfish and in box jellyfish, the medusa is the most prominent form. They are free-floating or free-swimming, with the mesoglea giving them buoyancy. Medusae generally have only hydrostatic skeletons, which allow the muscles to work against the fluids in the coelenteron to enable the medusae to swim.

The life cycle of cnidarians that contain both the polyp and medusa forms goes generally as follows: The planula eventually settles on the sea floor and changes into a polyp. The polyp can then reproduce asexually, commonly using one of two ways: Then, depending on the species, medusae can be formed asexually from the polyps, or, as occurs with the box jellyfish, the polyp itself can metamorphose into a medusa, and the cycle begins again.

As mentioned above, this cycle is common for the jellyfish and box jellyfish. The coral and sea anemones remain as polyps. The hydrozoans are the most diverse when it comes to life cycles: Cnidarians are generally carnivorous in nature, but some species, such as coral, get some of their food from special symbionts organisms that are benefited from and benefit the organisms they are with living within them.

Cnidaria - Wikipedia

There are two main types of symbionts: These symbionts capture the energy from the sun to produce sugars which are then passed on to their host as a source of food. Not all cnidarians possess these creatures however, and thus must capture their own food.

Cnidarian - Evolution: The exact relationships between the different cnidarian groups are unknown. Among theories proposed on the evolution of the phylum Cnidaria, most treat the radial symmetry and tissue level of organization as evidence that the group is primitive (that is, it evolved before the evolution of bilateral symmetry) and hold that the medusa is the original body form, being the. The Cnidaria (pronounced nidaria)as a group of animals are well known to many people under their common names, Sea Anemones, Corals and Jellyfish are all Cnidarians as are Hydras, Sea Whips, Sea Fans and Sea Pansies. Cnidarian, also called coelenterate, any member of the phylum Cnidaria (Coelenterata), a group made up of more than 9, living rutadeltambor.com marine animals, the cnidarians include the corals, hydras, jellyfish, Portuguese men-of-war, sea anemones, sea pens, sea whips, and sea fans.

Because most cnidarians lack such sensory organs as eyes, it is thought they hunt passively: Nematocysts are common in all cnidarians, and are the one major trait that separates this phylum from the others.

There are approximately types of nematocysts know to date that help distinguish between the various classes. The other two types are known as spirocysts and ptychocysts. They all work in basically the same way: Once a cnida has fired, it can no longer be used.

Most cnidarians are marine in nature, found from the shallow water to the depths of the abyss.Sponge flies, also known as spongilla-flies (Neuroptera, Sisyridae), are specialist predators of freshwater sponges. The female lays her eggs on vegetation overhanging water.

Phylum cndaria

The larvae hatch and drop into the water where they seek out sponges to feed on. Corals are marine organisms of class Anthozoa (Kingdom Animalia, Phylum Cnidaria, Class Anthozoa) that typically live in large colonies of identical rutadeltambor.com are important reef builders in tropical seas, and are secretors of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) that forms their hard skeleton.

Introduction to Cnidaria Jellyfish, corals, and other stingers: Cnidarians are incredibly diverse in form, as evidenced by colonial siphonophores, massive medusae and corals, feathery hydroids, and box jellies with complex eyes. Yet, these diverse animals are all armed with stinging cells called nematocysts.

Sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, sea pens, hydra

Cnidarians are united based on the presumption that their nematocysts have been. Cnidarian definition, any invertebrate animal, as a hydra, jellyfish, sea anemone, or coral, considered as belonging to the phylum Cnidaria, characterized by the specialized stinging structures in the tentacles surrounding the mouth; a coelenterate.

See more. Cnidarian, also called coelenterate, any member of the phylum Cnidaria (Coelenterata), a group made up of more than 9, living rutadeltambor.com marine animals, the cnidarians include the corals, hydras, jellyfish, Portuguese men-of-war, sea anemones, sea pens, sea whips, and sea fans.

Phylum Cnidaria. Cnidaria is a large phylum composed of some of the most beautiful of all the salt and freshwater organisms: the true jellyfish, box jellyfish, coral and sea anemones, and hydra.

Although Cnidaria is an incredibly diverse group of animals, there are several traits that link them together.

Cnidarian - Evolution | rutadeltambor.com